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Scratchr: taking Scratch online beyond Battersea

November 26, 2012 3 comments


Scratchr

In yet another update (and video) from the Digital R&D Fund projects, I caught up with David Jubb, artistic director of the Battersea Arts Centre (BAC) to see how the Scratchr project has been progressing, and what the future holds for the project.

“Scratchr has now been online for about 3 months,” he started. “Our original planned outcome remains unchanged: to create an online platform to enable creative dialogue between people who are interested in developing new ideas together. But as with any R&D process, there have been plenty of surprises along the way. Perhaps one of the most striking realisations is the way in which Scratchr, over time, could change the way BAC engages with artists and programmes new work in the future.”

Some of the stats from Scratchr make for exciting viewing: the site has 200+ active members; half of these have posted an “Itch” as an idea that they are interested to “Scratch”; the site has also had over 21,600 pageviews and 2,000 unique visitors; 55% of site visitors go to at least 20 pages, and about 62% of these visitors will stay for between 10 and 30 minutes on the site. Impressive stuff.

“We’re pleased with these early signs,” David added. “While the site membership is modest, the depth of engagement with the site is strong. It feels like it is mirroring the engagement with live Scratch back in 2000, with strong levels of interest by a committed community. That process led to Scratch being adopted and adapted by many arts organisations across the world.”

So what about Scratchr being adopted beyond BAC? “In terms of Scratchr, there are still lots of questions that we are still answering, and there is plenty of work to do to make the platform easier to use and more accessible to a general audience,” said David. “Perhaps the most interesting relationship – that we have yet to really scratch the surface with – is the relationship between live Scratch and the Scratchr online space.

“The potential to grow online engagement and a much wider audience feels massive. We think our next step is to find a way to embed a developer inside the organisation so that as ideas evolve we can flexibly test them, ensuring there’s a day-to-day playful relationship between the live and online experience.”

IWM’s Social Interpretation project: taking the project North and why tablets are tough

June 29, 2012 2 comments

Jane Audas, a freelance digital producer involved in the Imperial War Museum’s Social Interpretation project (SI) submitted this excellent diary entry updating us on how the project was coming along…

Social Interpretation project

A child using a kiosk at the Imperial War Museum

Social Interpretation moves onward. We are just snagging our app and sorting digital assets for more QR code roll out in the next month or so.

In July we will install 4 SI kiosks and 10 QR codes against objects in Imperial War Museum North. We have scaled up the kiosk size and are using touch screens rather than tablets. Tablets have not been so successful for us, maintenance-wise and usability-wise.

We are also going to change the user interface for the kiosks in the North, to ‘visitor voice’. This is so that they become proper comment kiosks, rather than, as they are in London, digital labels and comment kiosks – we think this will clear any confusion as to the purpose of these things.

So, how engaged have people been with the idea of commenting against our museums objects? We have had quite a few interactions – over 2,700 comments since April 5. They include lots of spam and lots of comments saying the museum is great. But there have also been some rather affecting comments.

From the SI kiosk underneath a 1939 baby’s gas mask we got the following:

Strange to think that this was not so long ago! I can remember the war as a teenager, only seems like yesterday. Tomorrow, I celebrate my 82nd birthday!

And underneath a VE day celebration photograph – with the prompt question: Photographs like this have become well-known as part of the story of the Second World War. Do they give a complete picture of how people felt? – we read:

I just could not think about how sad I would be if me, my mum and my friends were in the war

We hope and expect the level and depth of engagement to increase when the SI web pages go live. If you are sat in the comfort of your own home, browsing objects you are interested in, you are much more likely to think, type, collect and share it. Probably more likely than you are to in a busy gallery, typing on to a small tablet screen.

And the QR Codes? Well, they are another story..

Some research insights

February 27, 2012 Leave a comment

New Art Exchange who have blogged recently about their Culture Cloud project are working with the Interactive Cultures research team from the Birmingham Centre for Media and Cultural Research at Birmingham City University. The team includes Professor Tim Wall, Dr Paul Long, Dr Nick Webber, and Dr Simon Barber.

They’ve set up their own blog where they will be reporting on some of the research and evaluation of the Culture Cloud project. 

If you’re like us then you’ll be following their progress with some interest

Digital R&D Fund for Arts and Culture

October 12, 2011 Leave a comment

After a busy summer of digital days and a sea of applications (495!) the Digital R&D Fund for Arts and Culture selected 8 digital R&D projects that will run over the course of the year from October 2011 – October 2012.

This blog will be updated regularly by the projects however it’s not meant to last forever.  It is though a chance for you to hear directly from the 8 projects – the ups and the downs of their foray into innovation and hopefully take some of their learning back into your own organisations.